Clearing the player markets

Barin999

Journeyman
Yes, this might seem like a drastic idea.

The general idea is to open up markets by a specific selling design.
For sake of argument, let's leave global broker systems out of it, but focus on regional markets (as is suggested by Pantheon themselves).

A player can place items on sale. This happens by placing items into a storage system/npc vendor that will "hold on to them" until sold.
Other players within that region can view what's been offered for sale by interacting with this storage/vendor-system.

The items on sale themselves are listed with a specific price.
Each placed item, will have a specific time counting down. (the period itself is up to debate)
When the time has run out and the item is not sold within that timerperiod, the storagesystem/vendor is designed so that they will buy up that item for a small % of the price. Or with a fixed price relating to the tier and rarity of the item itself.
The cash that is been given is considerably lower then the demanding price. Still it can be considered as a buy out..the item is sold and dissappears from the market.
If the item already has a value, other npc's might offer that Base price for it. Like you'ld see in most selling systems.

Example: a bronze sword
Turning to an npc to sell it will give you a value of 2 silver.
A player tries to sell it using the vendor system, asking 4 silver. (with a npc-fee, that the buyer needs to pay additionally)
When the timer runs out, the item is being bought by design itself for a value of 20 copper.
A player tries to sell it using the vendor system and by direct communication, a sale with another player occurs selling the sword for 4 silver, avoiding fees or taxes.

The seller has five scenario's with items they put up for sale using this system:
  1. The item is bought by another player using this vendor system. And the player is getting the price they wanted.
  2. Another player contacts the player selling it, and they take it off the market and trade it directly.
  3. The item is not being sold within that timeframe and the vendor-system buys the item. The player will get a small return from that sale.
  4. The item is not being sold within that timeframe and the player takes it off the vendor before Scenario 3 occurs. They can put it back on, if they are convinced they want to sell it at higher price.
  5. The item is taken off the vendor-system and the player goes of to try and cash in at other npc's for a better value. (This could be by consuming no-value items and turning them into items with a value or by searching for specific npc's that want to buy that specific item. Blacksmith npc, buying up weapons etc.)
So what happens here.
  1. Wanted items will get sold at the price the seller is asking.
  2. Unwanted items will not remain on the market, pressing the price lower and lower..with possible flooding effects. And over time they will dissappear.
  3. With items dissappearing from the market, new space opens up for new players and a refresh of stock being put on the market.
  4. Sellers hope to get a good price, but if they are ok with it, will get at least something for their efforts.
Note: When interacting with the vendor, the seller can view all their items and the individual timers. The seller can decide to put sales on hold (in case of real life or strategic insights). The costumers do not see this timer ofc.
A possible ui feature might be to list them based on their running timer. So that items that are close to "expire" will shop up at the top if the list.

An addition would be: when a seller places an item, they get a message stating; Do you want this item on hold after X time has passed? If the seller agrees, the item will not be automatically sold, BUT it will be taken off the market. If the player disagrees, the item will be automatically sold using the design suggested above.
This last bit, allows player to guard items they do not want to sell at very low prices, but it also opens up the market for other players putting up the same item on the market. When the seller returns to their items being put on hold, they can then decide what to do with them. (put them back on the market or take them off to sell elsewhere).

Looking in the future, if a seller has put an item on sale and it's not selling. The player might have advanced to higher content and might care less for that old item that is not selling. After they tried to sell it, they might be content with the low price or with the value other npc's are offering for it. Overall, items do not linger on the market after the player's attention has moved away from it's value and they don't block the marketflow.
 
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Trasak

Apprentice
Staff member
Staff Writer
This sorta combines my consignment shop idea where you bring your items to a local shop and set the starting price and the incremental decrease in price while setting to time before each decrease, and the number of decreases you are willing to let it drop before taking it back off the market. This would add an option to either vendor sell it or return it to you. For the record I was theorizing that how much you pay the consignment shop is a combination of the final sale price and how long it was for sale. Rather than limit it to a combined shop but open it to all seller/market NPCs personal or guild.
 

Barin999

Journeyman
Apologies, it's not my intention to make a double post. I have not found your consignment shop idea on either websites.
The only thing I did find, was a thread from 2016, but you haven't replied on it.

Still, it's a good thing to consider there @Trasak . How would that play out, so it doesn't become a mathematical hurdle for players? No doubt, many are not interested in working out the math to set their prices etc.
 

Trasak

Apprentice
Staff member
Staff Writer
@Barin999 Math is the tool that is most commonly used to separate people from their money. Buying and selling is all about math, supply and demand, and intuition on what the future brings. Just like failing to learn your class will get you and your group killed, failing to understand how to buy and sell should lose you money. We are only talking about basic arithmetic here so I am more than comfortable with that level of math as a minimum bar to participate in server economics.
 

Barin999

Journeyman
I'm okay with losing money due to bad sales management. As long as it's not too complex for the broad player community to engage in.
If it's only beneficial for those select few with a brain for math or with the patience to sit through some research on a daily routine, it feels more like a bad design. The markets should be appealing to just about all players or at least enough to motivate them to dip their toe in from time to time.
 

Trasak

Apprentice
Staff member
Staff Writer
The way many consignment shops work is you say how much you want for your item and you give the shop a fee to have it in their store. Then the stores usually have a rule that after 3-6 weeks it will drop by 25% and will do so until its at 25% of the original price. Usually it will sell by then but if not then they give it back to you. If it sells the shop will also usually take a 10-25% cut of the sale price in addition to the original fee.

This is really all I am suggesting. What is your starting price? How long will you wait till you discount it? What percentage is your discount? How many times are you willing to discount it before you pull it off the market?

The shop will take a cut of the sale as well as charge you a fee based on how much time you are listing it for but you get some returned if it sells early. I think that counts as simple enough.
 

Trasak

Apprentice
Staff member
Staff Writer
Yeah, my commodities exchange is much more complicated. It needs to be though as it is supposed to reflect the true market value of raw materials to players and not to the game system itself and that true market value changes over time.
 
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